College Readiness Skills and Resources: Additional Online Resources

This guide contains resources and tools for high school students, teachers, and librarians related to writing, research and study skills that will help ease the transition to college.

Improve Your GOOGLE Search Experience

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http://www.popularresistance.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Google1-1024x576.jpg

Google Scholar

Google Scholar Logo

Google Scholar is a web search engine.

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites. Google Scholar helps you find relevant work across the world of scholarly research.

Why Google books?

Question: Why would you use Google Book Search?

Answer: Google Book Search (unlike WorldCAT) searches the full-text of the books in its inventory. WorldCAT is limited to searching only title, author, subject heading and other specific and limited information about a book.

Because Google Book Search lets you search within books, you can see a table of contents or an index or just a portion of a book. You can then locate the book in a nearby library.


Wikipedia - What is wrong with it?

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Wikipedia may provide accurate background information, but it must be verified and should not be cited as a source.  The bibliographies and related links that follow Wikipedia entries can be very useful and reliable sources that are often appropriate to cite in research papers.

Wikipedian Protester

http://www.xkcd2.com/285/

Source Types - Links to additional resource pages

See additional pages related to Source Types, Scholarly Journals, and Primary vs. Secondary Sources.